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How do I set up an appointment to pick up my personal belongings or car?

Click here to schedule an appointment (please note that same day appointments are not available):

Book Your Appointment

Are there any fees to get my personal belongings back?

Maybe. Each lienholder has different rules pertaining to personal property. Because there is a cost to us, there are fees. In some cases, these fees are billed directly to the lienholder, but sometimes the lienholder wants us to collect the fees from the person that the personal property belongs to. Book online and the system will respond to you.

How do I redeem my car after I have paid the lienholder the amount due?

You will be contacted by Coastline Recovery after you book online to schedule a time to pick up your vehicle. All is done electronically through our online booking system.

Do I come to the storage lot after my car has been repossessed?

No, you will not be able to enter the property. It’s mandatory you schedule an appointment online only.

Are there any fees to redeem my vehicle from Coastline after I pay the lienholder?

Yes, there are storage and administrative fees you will have to pay at time of redemption. Fees may vary. We cannot release the vehicle until we have received the authorization documents from the lienholder. Please be aware it can take up to 24 hours excluding weekends and holidays.

Does Coastline Recovery Services accept checks or credit cards?

No, we only accept cash.

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Is a police report required on all repossessions?

Yes. Whenever possession is taken of any vehicle by or on behalf of its legal owner under the terms of a security agreement or lease agreement, the person taking possession shall contact, for the purpose of providing the information required pursuant to subdivision (d), within one hour after taking possession of the vehicle, by the most expeditious means available, the city police department where the taking of possession occurred, if within an incorporated city, or the sheriff’s department of the county where the taking of possession occurred, if outside an incorporated city, or the police department of a campus of the University of California or the California State University, if the taking of possession occurred on that campus. If, after an attempt to notify, law enforcement is unable to receive and record the notification required pursuant to subdivision (d), the person taking possession of the vehicle shall continue to attempt notification until the information required pursuant to subdivision (d) is provided. For the notification required by this section, the person shall report only the following information and in the following order: 

 (1) The approximate location of the repossession.

 (2) The date and approximate time of the repossession. 

(3) The vehicle year, make, and model. 

(4) The last six digits of the vehicle identification number.

 (5) The registered owner as provided on the repossession assignment.

 (6) The legal owner requesting the repossession as provided on the repossession     assignment.

 (7) The name of the repossession agency. 

(8) The telephone number of the repossession agency. [VEH 28]

Must licensees make condition reports of repossessions?

Yes. Repossession agencies are required to keep and maintain adequate records of all transactions including condition reports reflecting the condition of a vehicle at the time of repossession and its odometer reading. A licensee shall not appraise or determine the value of any collateral, whether damaged or not. A licensee may complete a condition report that makes a general assessment of the collateral. A condition report shall include the following statement: "In accordance with Section 7507.115 of the Business and Professions Code, this condition report is a general assessment of the collateral and does not include all damage or missing parts." [BPC 7507.115], [BPC 7507.3]

What is to be done with personal effects?

Personal effects shall be removed from the collateral, including any personal effect that is mounted but detachable from the collateral by a release mechanism. A complete and accurate inventory of the personal effects shall be made, and the personal effects shall be labeled and stored by the licensee for a minimum of 60 days in a secure manner, except those personal effects removed by or in the presence of the debtor or the party in possession of the collateral at the time of the repossession. If the licensee or the licensee’s agent cannot determine whether the property attached to the collateral is a personal effect or a part of the collateral, then that fact shall be noted on the inventory and the licensee or agent shall not be obligated to remove the item from the collateral, unless the item can be removed without the use of tools, in which case it shall be removed and inventoried. The licensee or the licensee’s agent shall notify the debtor that if the debtor takes the position that an item is a personal effect, then the debtor shall contact the legal owner to resolve the issue. [BPC 7507.9]

What is to be done with deadly weapons & dangerous drugs contained in or on collateral at time of repossession?

Deadly weapons and dangerous drugs shall be turned over to any law enforcement agency for retention. These items shall be entered on the inventory and a notation shall be made as to the date, time, and place the deadly weapon or dangerous drug was turned over to the law enforcement agency, and a receipt from the law enforcement agency shall be maintained in the records of the repossession agency. [BPC 7507.9(b)(1)]

What is to be done with combustibles after being removed from repossessed collateral?

Combustibles shall be inventoried and noted as “disposed of, dangerous combustible” and disposed of in a reasonable and safe manner. [BPC 7507.9(b)(2)]

What is to be done with food items after being removed from repossessed collateral?

Food and other health hazard items shall be inventoried and noted as “disposed of, health hazard,” and disposed of in a reasonable and safe manner. [BPC 7507.9(b)(3)]

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How long must a repossession agency hold on to personal effects from repossessed collateral?

Personal effects may be disposed of after being held for at least 60 days. [BPC 7507.9(c)]

What is to be done with Special Interest License Plates from repossessed collateral?

Environmental, Olympic, special interest, or other license plates issued, remains the personal effects of the debtor. They shall be removed from the collateral and inventoried. If the plates are not claimed by the debtor within 60 days, they shall either (1) be effectively destroyed and the licensee shall, within 30 days thereafter, notify the Department of Motor Vehicles of their effective destruction on a form promulgated by the chief that has been approved as to form by the Director of the Department of Motor Vehicles; or (2) be retained by the licensee indefinitely to be returned to the debtor upon request, in which case the licensee shall not charge more than 60 days’ storage on the plates. [BPC 7507.9(f)]

May a repossession agency charge a fee for storing personal effects?

Yes. A licensee may charge the debtor for storing personal effects. The inventory shall include the name, address, business hours, and telephone number of the repossession agency to contact for recovering the personal effects and an itemization of all personal effects removal and storage charges that will be made by the repossession agency. [BPC Code 7507.9(d)]

Must a debtor pay a fee normally $15, to the police department or sheriff’s department before redeeming the repossessed vehicle?

Yes. This fee is not the obligation of the lien holder or repossessor. [GOV 26751, 41612] The recovering agency cannot pay or submit the the fee on behalf of the client or debtor.

May an individual working for a repossession agency pay the fee to, or retrieve the receipt from, the chief of police or parking authority.

No. An individual working for a repossession agency shall NOT pay the fee to, or retrieve the receipt from, the chief of police or parking authority. [GOV 41612]